THEME






Anthony Mackie, photographed by Miko Lim.







nellachronism:

FLY, YOU FOOLS.

nellachronism:

FLY, YOU FOOLS.







in the flesh color palette: kieren, amy and simon




floozys:

"act like a lady, think like a man"

conform to gender roles, devalue your thoughts




Hawaii Five-0 + Chin/Danny, season 1




It’s not like I don’t realize we’re not exactly the most normal family on the block. I mean, not every teenage girl comes home to a garage full of glocks and AK-47s.




fuck-yeah-feminist:

lifeworkfun:

Meet The First Woman To Make It Into The FDNY’s Calendar Of Heroes. Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department. This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men.  There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.

Hell yeah!

fuck-yeah-feminist:

lifeworkfun:

Meet The First Woman To Make It Into The FDNY’s Calendar Of Heroes.

Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department.

This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men.

There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.

Hell yeah!




itf - heartbreaking moments




paullwalkers:

SCREENCAP MEME → Scott/Stiles + Looking Down

(Requested by whatthehalefire)

paullwalkers:

SCREENCAP MEME → Scott/Stiles + Looking Down

(Requested by whatthehalefire)




Anonymous
what's extreme is people like you not realizing that sometimes diversity can go too far. When characters are made black or disabled or gay for no reason it hurts the story and it hurts the cause of the people who are supposedly being represented.

summercomfort:

blue-author:

I like how you sent me an ask claiming that no one says a thing except people rhetorically making fun of the position that no one actually holds, and then you send me an ask clarifying that you hold exactly the same position.

I’m kind tempted to just not address anything else you said and just marvel in the perfection of that.

What’s the reason for making a character white? What’s the reason for making a character straight? What’s the reason for making a character abled or neurotypical or cis?

When you assume that making a character Other relative to yourself weakens the narrative, you’re revealing a terrible thing about yourself: that you can’t imagine that those people have backstories and inner lives the way that you do.

Every single person in a fictional narrative is ultimately there because a writer decided they needed to be there, but when the person looks like you and matches your expectations, you accept that this person who was made up for the plot had a life full of events that led them to the point where they’re appearing on the screen or page.

But when your expectations aren’t met, you start saying it’s forced. You can’t accept that events led them here because you don’t grant them the kind of life that you know you have. Your empathy does not extend to them. 

Look at how many white people think they can relate to a little girl in an industrial orphanage who falls in with a capitalist robber baron during the Great Depression more than they can relate to a little girl in the foster system in modern New York who falls in with a career politician, all because of a difference of race. The original Annie’s situation and world were only slightly less alien to us than the Victorian period, but making her white somehow makes her relatable in a way that a little girl who clearly exists in our world isn’t.

The fact is, empathy is linked to imagination and we can (and do!) relate to people who are literally alien beings in literally alien worlds. The choice not to relate to Quvenzhané Wallis as Annie—or a Black or gay or female or trans video game character—is a choice to shut off both imagination and empathy. 

The failing is not with the narrative, it’s with you.

Love the 4th parag, especially




schwarzbrot:

shhh quick-ish In The Flesh sketches




she was controlling me.